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Indigenous people in Canada far more likely to be shot and killed by police

Indigenous people in Canada far more likely to be shot and killed by police

TORONTO -- An Indigenous person in Canada is more than 10 times more likely to have been shot and killed by a police officer in Canada since 2017 than a white person in Canada. A CTV News analysis reveals that of the 66 people shot and killed by police in that timeframe for whom race or heritage could be identified, 25 were Indigenous. That's nearly 40 per cent of the total. Adjusted for population based...
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Woman mauled and killed by her pit bull during walk in Canada

Woman mauled and killed by her pit bull during walk in Canada

A Canadian woman was killed when her pit bull mauled her during a walk — after she’d left an even more dangerous dog at home, according to reports. The unidentified woman was first spotted dead in a ditch Tuesday morning in Nova Scotia when a teenage jogger came across the on-the-loose dog and feared it would attack her, too, before it fled, CBC said. Another neighbor, Jocelyn Parker, then arrived, telling the station the woman’s...
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Pan African B2B Portal Sector.Africa Launches with local currency payments across 33 countries

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 20 Feb 2020 Ade Atobatele Gboza Gbosa Technologies +234 802 314 0022 nigeria.com@gmail.com Sector.Africa is Africa's FIRST B2B Business Hub Ikeja, Lagos: Gboza Gbosa Technologies Ltd today announced Sector.Africa, a new Pan Africa Business Hub. Sector.Africa is SaaS that offers a new way for businesses to do business among themselves all over Africa. “It's all about discovery” says Ade Atobatele, CEO at Sector.Africa. “You can't do business with people you don't know...
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Indigenous people in Canada far more likely to be shot and killed by police

Indigenous people in Canada far more likely to be shot and killed by police

TORONTO —
An Indigenous person in Canada is more than 10 times more likely to have been shot and killed by a police officer in Canada since 2017 than a white person in Canada.

A CTV News analysis reveals that of the 66 people shot and killed by police in that timeframe for whom race or heritage could be identified, 25 were Indigenous.

That’s nearly 40 per cent of the total. Adjusted for population based on 2016 census data, it means 1.5 out of every 100,000 Indigenous Canadians have been shot and killed by police since 2017, versus 0.13 out of every 100,000 white Canadians.

“It’s totally alarming,” Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde told CTVNews.ca via telephone from Ottawa on June 17.

“This is not acceptable, it’s not right in 2020, but the trends are there.”

The disparity doesn’t stop there. Citing Statistics Canada data and various academic studies, a 2019 report from the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) found several other ways in which the Canadian justice system disproportionately targets Indigenous Canadians, including:

“Why is it that we’re 4.5 per cent of the population in Canada as First Nations people, but yet the jails are full of our people?” Bellegarde said.

Those who study the intersection of Indigenous Canadians and Canadian-style policing say the answer to that question cannot be found in what happens as cases make their way through the criminal justice system. Nor can it be found in what happens after police arrive at the scene of an incident, or in what happens as officers are dispatched.

The issues that lead to Indigenous Canadians facing overrepresentation in the Canadian justice system have roots that stretch years, decades, even generations into the past, experts say – and will never be addressed if attention isn’t paid to injustices in other parts of the system.

“The conversation needs to be about systemic racism, and the continued colonial constructs that set up too many of these highly dangerous encounters,” Norm Taylor, an executive adviser who has worked with police leaders and provincial governments on issues related to community safety, told CTVNews.ca via telephone from Oshawa, Ont. on June 17.

A SYSTEMIC PROBLEM

Taylor was one of the 11 experts on policing in Indigenous communities who put together the CCA report, which found that the current Indigenous overrepresentations in the justice system are directly linked to historical mistreatment of Indigenous peoples.

They’re also tied to the worse outcomes faced by Indigenous Canadians when it comes to poverty, mental health, addictions and other socioeconomic factors that are considered risk factors for negative encounters with the justice system.

“If you look at your sample, in the vast majority of those cases, you’re going to find … they’re people with a host of risk factors operating, and the system has failed them,” Taylor said.

“In many instances, the subject will hold similar contempt for the health-care system, child welfare, schools and any other elements of the state-run human services, because the system has not served them well. It has not served their families well.”

The CCA report also concluded that moving away from these approaches and improving Indigenous health and well-being can best be achieved by adapting policing approaches to meet the needs of Indigenous communities, focusing on relationships and building trust rather than law enforcement.

Many of these themes are echoed in the recommendations in the 2019 report from the inquiry examining the cases of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, which are aimed at adding new mechanisms to ensure policing agencies meet the needs of the communities they serve.

These ideas may sound prescient now, as calls to defund the police gather steam across North America, but they’re hardly new. Academics and Indigenous leaders have been touting them for decades, and many police leaders have more recently followed suit.

“Officers are doing the job that is asked, and often they’re doing it under difficult and high-risk circumstances,” Taylor said.

“One of the questions we have to be asking is ‘Is it the job they should be doing? Are they adequately prepared to deal with all the intercultural mistrust? Do they even have the skills to provide a trauma-informed perspective?'”

‘KEEP PUSHING’

Advice along these lines – which Taylor describes as “more about public health than … about policing” can be found in report after report after report presented to governments going back to the last century. While some parts of the country have slowly been moving in this direction, Bellegarde said the continued deaths of Indigenous Canadians at the hands of police are proof that much more needs to be done.

“The complacency of governments for lack of implementation of these reports and the recommendations therein is killing our people,” he said.

Specific starting points for action could include making policing an essential service on reserves, guaranteeing stable funding levels for community leaders to rely on, Bellegarde said, as well as creating civilian police oversight bodies for communities that use the RCMP, increased screening for racial biases during the recruitment process, adding more Indigenous representation in positions of authorities and potentially redirecting some police funding to dedicated mental health response teams.

Although pushing for these changes has long been an exercise in frustration, Bellegarde said he is hopeful that the current wave of protests for justice reform will bear fruit.

“We have to take advantage of the groundswell of support. We have to keep pushing harder,” he said.

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Woman mauled and killed by her pit bull during walk in Canada

Woman mauled and killed by her pit bull during walk in Canada

A Canadian woman was killed when her pit bull mauled her during a walk — after she’d left an even more dangerous dog at home, according to reports.

The unidentified woman was first spotted dead in a ditch Tuesday morning in Nova Scotia when a teenage jogger came across the on-the-loose dog and feared it would attack her, too, before it fled, CBC said.

Another neighbor, Jocelyn Parker, then arrived, telling the station the woman’s injuries were “rather extensive and it was very apparent she had passed away.”

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) immediately put out an alert for the “tan & brown Pitbull on the loose,” warning, “Stay indoors, do not approach, considered dangerous.”

The force later revealed that the dog died after being hit by a car more than an hour after the attack in Middle Musquodoboit.

A Nova Scotia woman was killed by her own dog while out on a walk.

Neighbors told The Chronicle Herald they were shocked when they discovered which dog had killed her owner — because they assumed it would have been a second pit bull that they insist was more threatening.

“When I found out it was that dog I was shocked, I couldn’t believe it,” the male neighbor said, claiming it previously attacked the owner.

“Honestly the other dog was always a constant worry for myself when I’d leave the house to go to work,” he said, worried about it “attacking the animals or attacking my wife when she was out working.”

“Those dogs were the focal point of her life,” he said of his neighbor.

“I think she really tried to help the problem dog become a better dog.”

Police confirmed that the victim “was walking her dog when it attacked her.”

“Our thoughts are with the victim’s family during this difficult time,” the RCMP said.

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Pan African B2B Portal Sector.Africa Launches with local currency payments across 33 countries

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 20 Feb 2020

Ade Atobatele

Gboza Gbosa Technologies
+234 802 314 0022

nigeria.com@gmail.com

Sector.Africa is Africa’s FIRST B2B Business Hub

Ikeja, Lagos: Gboza Gbosa Technologies Ltd today announced Sector.Africa, a new Pan Africa Business Hub.

Sector.Africa is SaaS that offers a new way for businesses to do business among themselves all over Africa.

“It’s all about discovery” says Ade Atobatele, CEO at Sector.Africa. “You can’t do business with people you don’t know or trust.”

Features and benefits of Sector.Africa include.

• Single currency pricing

• Local Currency payments

• A growing community of like-minded business people

Sector.Africa will be available starting today, for FREE.

For more information on Sector.Africa, visit https://sector.africa.

About Gboza Gbosa Technologies Ltd: We are a full-service data drive IT consultancy, with over 40 years experience on multiple continents.

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